About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN2 12
CNN 10
CNNW 10
CSPAN 10
MSNBCW 7
FBC 6
MSNBC 6
CNBC 5
KTVU (FOX) 4
WBAL (NBC) 4
SFGTV2 3
SFGTV 2
WRC (NBC) 2
KICU 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 94
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wan
funds our priorities. it proposes an increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abr
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
, and she find it too tough. and she probably decided that education is the right way to go. i don't know if they are going to stick together very long. she has a dream and i think that's wonderful. and she has a courage to make the dream come true. and going to college definitely going to help her to make her dream come true. i think that's wonderful. kevin, i can write my songs on a computer. they have a computer lab. it opens up the possibilities of song composition... what's the possibility of getting some food in this house soon? i'm going grocery shopping tomorrow. put what you want on the list. i can't believe how many forms i have to fill out. i can't believe we're out of cereal. put it on the list. o.k. rebecca... casey. 1097 e street. apartment number 3. boston, mass. 02168. we're almost out of peanut butter. i just bought that jar. hey, look, a coupon. two for the price of one. just... i know-- put it on the list. phone number. (617) 686-7731. age: 28. father: patrick casey. mother: margaret casey, deceased. we should get more cookies. ( sighs ) gee, they want to know everythin
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
, the education department is taking action to make sure disabled school children are not shut out from school sports programs. nbc's chief education correspondent rehema ellis has that story. >> reporter: it was a big week for 13-year-old owen grosser. get in there. >> reporter: sinking not one but two three-pointers the first time he stepped out onto the court this season. owen, an eighth grader, has down syndrome. disabled students like him already have the right to participate in school sports but this week, the department of education released new guidelines on how to incorporate those students onto teams, something some cash-strapped schools have struggled with. >> we have needed more cooperation, more guidelines from the top. and we believe this is going to lead to some standardization and certainly more opportunity for these families and kids. >> reporter: some of the doe's suggestions are simple, a visual cue for hearing-impaired student who wants to run track, the elimination of the two-hand touch rule in swimming so a student with one arm can compete. but the recommendations also st
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
, and any of you who doubt the power of public education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wid
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
by a single mother. had no education. and really, no hope. and what i always say, i was lucky that i was put in front of an icon of empowerment. >> he is. every time i interview him, i feel empowered. >> that's true. what he is is an incredible educator. by the grace of the universe i was able to fall in the lap of this educator. he helped get me out of that place where i was, where there was no home. >> he was homeless at the time. what i love about mike's story, is mike just didn't help himself, he started a small business to start with. one of the young women who worked for him was addicted to meth. how did you end up in your new business? >> the young woman had come to work for me a number of years ago. you could tell something was wrong. she was addicted to methamphetamine. she was completely off drugs in a few days. it ournd out her father, her dad was incredibly successful in the metal recycling business. i got a call from him shortly thereafter who said anybody who has influence over human beings like this needs to help. he taught me the business. seven months later he allowed me to
to create the visa programs for skilled, highly educated workers to establish an agricultural worker program, and then establish a pathway to citizenship for those illegal immigrants who deserve the opportunity in their judgment. well, new york democrat senator chuck schumer calling the bipartisan blueprint a major breakthrough. he claims his fellow democrats are not looking to play politics with this plan. >> we do not want immigration as a wage issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. it is our hope that these principles can be turned into legislation by march and have a markup by chairman leahy with the goal of passage out of the senate by late spring or summer. lou: senator mccain bluntly acknowledged the republican party has been losing support of hispanic voters and says this agreement will change all that. >> the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that in many issues which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, you will find that this agreement has very little difference from th
there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is w
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
finance over a period of years and her goal is to educate people so the great depression will never happen again. but it's very much in a buy of its time an idea we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills will all be okay. >> california senator dianne feinstein proposed legislation today that would then so-called assault weapons and ammunition magazines with more than 10 rounds. she was joined by other members of congress as well as police officers and mayors around the country. this is a little more than an hour. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i really want to welcome you. i am pleased to be joined this morning by a cross-section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today police chiefs, mayors, teachers,.yours, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and others who care deeply about the issue. i'd really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and in the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us have been working to provide violence for decades. t
jobs and we want education and we want health care and immigration was number five or number six, but what they sense is that we don't welcome them and we have to be the party that celebrates immigration. every time the president talks about business, there's always a but in the sentence. when you hear some republicans talk about immigration, there is always a but in the sentence. people sense that, they have a gut feel for that. we've got to make people feel welcome. >> so just kind of going around the table. is the problem the messengers? is the problem the message? is the problem policy? >> i think it's a combination. the core principles we have are right and part of the problem is exactly what the secretary is talking about in terms of relevance. part of relevance, not only means how you talk about it, where you're willing to go. for too long too many republican candidates only went to certain parts of america to talk about their message. we have a message for immigrants and message for small business owners and message for college kids just coming out of college. it's about
. >> catholic schools week is a national event celebrating catholic education through february 2nd. >>> time for a check of the forecast, back over to lynette as she moves in to the screen. >> let's talk about what is going on, we have the cold air, it's at the surface. what we are waiting for is the warm air to move in. with that, it rides over the cold air, that's why we are seeing the icing we are getting this morning, we will continue to get this morning, until it starts to switch over back to rain once the warm air starts to do its thing. temperatures coming in at 28 degrees, westminster, pilesville 28, 31 perry hall, columbia 28 degrees, stevensville freezing degree mark k 31 goldsboro. really, it depends on the temperatures, where you are, to see what type of precipitation you are getting this morning. future trend, picking up didn't snow, the rain, the sleet , the freezing rain through the morning, we will get a break and it looks like we can see a round of rain pushing in as we go in to the afternoon. it looks like your morning commute is going to be a rough one, still it could be d
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
and more importantly how to educate, train and develop leaders for the future. we are witnessing examples of increasing afghan national security force capabilities. i'll give you just one example. in november, the afghan berean corps successfully connected level operations across regional command south. these operations included all security element, police, army and afghan plan come afghan led the logistically supported by afghan forces. this is plan and conduct game the supply and separate resupply missions conducted by emerging afghan air force using helicopters. the afghan organizations demonstrate independently security force that assistance will focus at the next organizational level. while this supports a smaller footprint, it is not simply about doing life. this is about putting our advising and enabling resources in the right places at the right levels within the afghan national security force to ensure that afghan partners can hold the gains of the past. this is about the right mix this capabilities to security while continuing to support the afghan national security forces as t
is a fearless leader, answering the call to serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [a
investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president bid
school in connecticut, which left 20 children and six educators dead. >>> in advertising banner meant to promote discount haircuts ended up cutting power to thousands of san francisco customers today when it fell from the sky and landed on some pg&e lines. here you can see the banner dangling from the power lines. witnesses say they saw it fall from the back of a small plane and land on the liens around noon. that normally busy intersection was shut down while crews dealt with the situation. >> i saw the plane banner carrying the plane circling. and the banner kind of flailing and drifting. >> power has been restored now to all of the customers affected in the south of market and china basin areas. >>> a veteran oakland police officer shot while on duty last night is expected to fully recover. police say the officer was respond a car crash at the intersection of east 12th and 48th avenue in the fruitvale district. as officers arrived on scene, one of drivers ran off. when they went to investigate they say a suspect opened fire. the officer was hit in the leg, but still chased the qu
education and entrepreneurship, i was just lucky. but that helps me so i shouldn't feel ashamed about it, i should leverage it. that just makes sense. it helps being a man in a male-dominated industry or to speak english as a first language. all these things help. they're not enough, but they have to be used in a meaningful way. if we don't realize this, then we leave assets on the table. >> that's interesting. so being a male, it obviously is happening. you're a male in a male dominated industry, but you're saying taking a step back, recognizing that this is an asset actually changes the way you can use it? >> right. because otherwise they may be invisible to us, right? sometimes it takes someone else to realize the things that we already have, but they're hidden in plain sight. so, for instance, i don't think about my gender that much, but if you are a 19-year-old woman who wants to raise money to open up an auto repair shop, people are going to be looking at you, irrespective of what skills, knowledge, experiences you have because they make certain assumptions about you. that doesn't mak
for education. we also must insure economic development and political progress, political development. these things and these principles are very important, and this is why the arab spring took place at the end of the day. and i believe that such principles are still not respected in our countries, such freedoms are not yet respected. we still have a long way to go. regardless of what the west thinks or does not think, we don't really -- we should not really mind what the west says. the west can speak and say, and we also can speak and say whatever we think. however, i believe that the reform process must start from us, must start from the arab world. so that we would bring back the human dignity to each citizen. we must respect individuals, and we must not force any citizen to do anything that he or she does not want to do. i believe that it's the arab spring happened because of the oppression that we were living under. that oppression took away our freedoms, our liberties, our human rights, and that is why i believe that we need this revolution, we needed this revolution, and we nee
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)